lunchbuddiesplus

Learning and Sharing

Blurt Alert!

on February 28, 2015

boy Raising hand in classroom

Social thinking is a dynamic process, so the Lunch Buddies are always working on self-regulation skills. It is so important that they understand what that means for them and what it looks like in the classroom.  Impulsivity is obviously related to sensory and emotional self-regulation. Impulse control develops over time and students gradually learn self-monitoring skills from kindergarten through third grade. When self-monitoring skills are not mastered by fourth grade, students tend to get into trouble on a regular basis.  Verbal impulse control takes longer to develop.  Although it is developmentally expected that 8 year olds occasionally blurt out in class or in conversation, we, as adults, need to be mindful that we teach them the why behind verbal impulse control and the how of self-regulation strategies rather than just telling them to stop!  For more information on how impulse control develops read this great article:

http://www.mom.me/parenting/5106-what-age-do-kids-have-impulse-control/

Kids need to learn specific skills to control impulsive behaviors.  Impulsive behaviors are unexpected and affect the ability to function as part of a group.  In the above article, Jennifer Little, a former teacher with a doctorate in educational psychology, lists the following as necessary skills to control impulses:

  • social skills
  • delayed gratification
  • attention and memory skills
  • oral language skills
  • cause and effect
  • risk management

To help promote and develop verbal impulse control we use the following resources:

A script I made using the Smarty Ears app Custom Boards

photo

Blurts are not fair.  Cutting in with words is just like cutting in line.  Blurts are annoying and make classmates feel uncomfortable.

I love this social story from KID CODES

5ec3607fe94c102fd709239cdb9991cb

demoSocialStoryICanStopBlurting

Find this story at http://teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kid-Codes-Helping-Kids-Figure-It-Out/

We must explain why it is unexpected to blurt and model what to do instead.

My Best,

Robin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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