lunchbuddiesplus

Learning and Sharing

Practicing Self-Control

on October 29, 2013

brain-and-learning

Playing the game Slamwich requires a great deal of self-control.  Last week we played and several things happened.   There were lots of slip-slaps.  slip-slap happens when a player slaps the deck when there is no slamwich, double decker, or stop thief  card in the center pile.  A slip-slap happens when we are not practicing self-control.  Some token towers went flying around the table last week.  Some students were out of their seat and in the middle of the table.  Wow!  I could tell that not everyone was having fun because of the lack of self-control around the table.  Today I started the group on a different path to get to Slamwich.

First, we read this book

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This wonderful book helps us understand what it means to receive positive and negative feedback and how to respond appropriately to that feedback.  I have noticed that some of the students struggle to see feedback simply as information and/or advice that can help you improve.  So, we read this book to prepare everyone for receiving feedback during the game.

Next, we discussed emotional regulation.  Slamwich is a very exciting game and it is easy to lose control over your level of excitement.

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These visuals helped the students understand what silly and serious looks like and when they are expected and unexpected.  We decided that a game of Slamwich had rules and that we could be playful and have fun, but not be silly.  These visuals are free downloads at http://autismteachingstragies.com.

Then we played Slamwich

GAMEWRIGHT-200

I think we all had a much better time.  Self-control is much easier for some people than others.  We must keep at it because self-control will help us to be better friends, better citizens, and better employees in the future.

My Best,

Robin

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One response to “Practicing Self-Control

  1. mhkeiger says:

    What a great game for working on self-control! I also read “Thanks for the Feedback” with my kiddos a couple of weeks ago. It was very helpful as they sometimes forget to look and sound like they are accepting feedback or even compliments.

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