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Learning and Sharing

The Pacing Board

on July 5, 2013

pacing

 

 

I started summer ESY speech therapy this week.  There are 20 students on my caseload and only 1 requiring social skills coaching.  So I had to pull out some of my best visual strategies that were gathering dust while I was busy with other  communication disorders.  Several of my summer students have unintelligible conversational speech.  A couple of them have trouble initiating and sequencing words in sentences.  One student struggles to  sequence syllables in words.  Two students delete final consonants.  One student has a fluency disorder.  The one therapy tool that I can use with all these students is a pacing board.  It is easy to make, easy to use and easy to share with parents and teachers.

As a visual-motor cueing system, the pacing board is often not used to its fullest potential.  This is how I am using pacing boards this summer…

 

photo

 

 

This one is used for increasing utterances.  The green dot indicates the beginning of the utterance and the red dot indicates the end.  The student will choose which center she wants to go to.  Then she will tap out the big sentence.  The teacher and I will model for her and her responses will be imitated at first with the goal to fade the pacing board for a spontaneous sentence.

 

butterfly

This pacing board is used for syllable sequencing.  The pretty butterflies have glitter on them which adds a tactile element as the student touches each one.

 

These “cushy” Buzz Lightyear stickers make a great pacing board for my student working on fluency.

buzz

 

 

Watch this wonderful video clip called Keeping Pace.  It explains the how and why of the pacing board strategy.

My best,

Robin

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One response to “The Pacing Board

  1. Awesome! I’m so glad Pacing Boards are working for you and your students. So simple, right?!
    It’s like my #1 recommendation. I’m glad you found the video helpful too. Can you believe the boys in the video, one of which is my son, are now 8!
    Keep up the great work on the blog!
    Chris

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